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MDNR Report

The Michigan DNR Wildlife Disease Laboratory and the Michigan State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory today announced they have confirmed that a free-ranging white-tailed deer in Genesee County has died from epizootic hemorrhagic disease.

Flint, Mich. is in Genesee County.

EHD is a viral disease, sometimes fatal, found in wild ruminants such as white-tailed deer, mule deer and elk.

The disease is transmitted by a type of biting fly called a midge. Infection does not always result in the disease. Signs of illness within infected animals are highly variable, ranging from none at all to extensive internal bleeding and fluid accumulation. There is no evidence that humans can contract the EHD virus.

Illness can come on suddenly and severely, but also can linger for weeks or months in a low-grade state. In severe forms of the disease, deer lose their appetite and fear of humans, grow progressively weaker, salivate excessively and finally become unconscious. Due to a high fever and dehydration, infected deer often seek water to lower their body temperature and to rehydrate, and then are found sick or dead along or in bodies of water.


MDNR Report

The Michigan DNR is seeking candidates for its 2018 Conservation Officer Recruit School, a 23-week training academy that is the first step in becoming a conservation officer.

Recruit School 9 runs July 15-Dec. 21, 2018, at the training academy in Dimondale, near Lansing, Michigan.

"The academy demands total effort and commitment," said 1st Lt. Steve Burton, training section supervisor. "It challenges recruits academically and physically. But those who succeed are on the path to an exciting, fulfilling career as a Michigan conservation officer. Not just anyone can wear our gray and green uniform. Only the finest men and women should apply."


MDNR Report

Michigan Busy Stocking Fish This YearThe Michigan DNR announced the totals from its spring and summer fish stocking efforts. The DNR stocked a total of 25,470,199 fish that weighed more than 320 tons and consisted of 11 different species and one hybrid.

To complete this task, it took more than 380 stocking trips to nearly 760 stocking sites, more than 103,000 miles traveled over the course of 3,052 hours using 19 specialized stocking trucks.

"We had excellent spring and summer stocking seasons that will bring significant benefits and fishing opportunities to Michigan anglers," said Ed Eisch, DNR fish production manager. "With the hard work and dedication of our staff, fish were reared and delivered to stocking sites in excellent condition. The numbers produced and stocked were right on target for most areas."