By Bob Fratzke, with Glenn Helgeland

A flyover isn’t cheap, but the birds-eye view and some aerial photographs can save you scouting time and energy and make your on-the-ground efforts more efficient.

A flyover isn’t cheap, but the birds-eye view and some aerial photographs can save you scouting time and energy and make your on-the-ground efforts more efficient.

Summer is an important time to scout for deer.

Whitetails have different habits or patterns ñ in the spring, summer, once the season begins, within the season, and right after the season. Continual scouting is a lot of work, but it's worth it. You will learn what's in the area. That does a lot for your confidence, and should help your shooting opportunities.

You will find with continual scouting you will change your habits. You will find yourself continually looking at food sources, weather and cover and telling yourself that deer will do this or that, or won't do it, and then you'll go check. The whole thing gets to be a passion more than a game.

In early summer, everything is green, fully leafed and growing. Crops are up and, fortunately, the corn isn't too high yet. This is the time you want to begin evaluating deer in the area you plan to hunt. Evaluate them from a distance and cover as much territory as you can. Don't mess around in their habitat.

Crop rotation and growth are important. Crop rotation will change from year to year, and it will have a definite effect on deer and their movement patterns. You need to take note of various crop locations if you're going to hunt there the first week or so of season, because the deer will still be coming to those fields to feed.


(Provided by IDNR)

The Indian DNR is asking the public to help it monitor summer production of wild turkeys during July and August and record sightings through a DNR web-based survey.

This online system allows for broader coverage across the state and greater participation from the public.


(Provided by MDNR)

New Michigan Duck Stamp Features Two ShovelersThe Michigan Duck Hunters Association, in cooperation with the Michigan DNR, has introduced the 2017 collector's edition Michigan duck stamp and prints.

The Michigan Waterfowl Stamp Program, established in 1976, has become an icon for waterfowl hunters and wetland conservation enthusiasts. During the past 41 years, the program has gained popularity with collectors and conservation groups throughout the United States.

The Michigan Duck Hunters Association, a nonprofit organization dedicated to waterfowl and wetland conservation, coordinates the program in partnership with the DNR. Proceeds from stamp sales will be used to fund Michigan Duck Hunters Association projects, with 10 percent used to match DNR funding for purchasing, restoring and enhancing wetlands.